April 19, 2024

This week in Tribal Business News, Navy veteran and Indigenous entrepreneur Elizabeth Perez discusses tribal energy investments.
Additionally, tribes across the country improve food security on their reservations through a $400 million program, and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma doubles the size of one of its busiest health clinics. 
Myriad opportunities offer tribes solutions for energy resilience
Elizabeth Perez, a member of the North Fork Rancheria Mono Indians and founder of San Diego-based GC Green Inc., discusses the opportunity for tribes to leverage energy investments for economic growth and why they need to get in front of the issue of climate change.
Tribes bolster sovereignty, food security through expanded local purchasing programs
Tribes across the country are taking advantage of the USDA’s Local Food Purchase Assistance Cooperative Agreement Program to improve food security on their reservations, most often for tribal elders and needy families. 
​​Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma to double size of McAlester health clinic with $70M renovation
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma plans to break ground this fall on a $70 million expansion that will add 51,000 square feet and more than double the size of the tribe’s health clinic in McAlester, Okla., increasing capacity for patient volume by 65 percent. 
Tribal Business News Briefs
Lastly, Native American CDFI leader Chrystel Cornelius received the prestigious Heinz Award; a Michigan tribe gets $25 million for broadband infrastructure; and MIT Solve revealed the 2022 Indigenous Community Fellowship cohort
Thank you for taking time to share your thoughts with us today.
Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 
For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.
Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 
Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

source

About Author

Leave a Reply