June 19, 2024

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U.S. Global Investors offers exchange traded funds (ETFs) in addition to mutual funds.
Get the need-to-know information about our financial products, from investment objectives, strategies, and performance to fees and fund management.
Explore the performance of our eight no-load mutual funds here, which invest in a range of industries from natural resources and emerging markets, to precious metals and bonds.
The Gold and Precious Metals Fund is the first no-load gold fund in the U.S. We have a history as pioneers in portfolio management in this specialized sector. Our team brings valuable background in geology and mining finance, important to understanding the technical side of the business.
The World Precious Minerals Fund complements our Gold and Precious Metals Fund by giving investors increased exposure to junior and intermediate mining companies for added growth potential. With a high level of expertise in this specialized sector, our portfolio management team includes professionals with experience in geology, mineral resources and mining finance.
The Global Resources Fund takes a multi-faceted approach to the natural resources sector by investing in energy and basic materials. The fund invests in companies involved in the exploration, production and processing of petroleum, natural gas, coal, alternative energies, chemicals, mining, iron and steel, and paper and forest products, and can invest in any part of the world.
The China Region Fund invests in one of the world’s fastest-growing regions. The China region has experienced many changes since the fund opened in 1994 but we believe the region continues to hold further investment opportunities. Many countries in the region possess characteristics similar to the United States prior to the industrial revolution: a thriving, young workforce, migration from rural to urban areas and shifting sentiment toward consumption.
The Emerging Europe Fund focuses on a region that shares the same continent as the established economies of Western Europe, but has more in common with other emerging markets around the world. Many countries across emerging Europe are rich in resources, have strong banking and manufacturing sectors, healthy economies and lower debt levels than their western neighbors.
The Global Luxury Goods Fund provides investors access to companies around the world that are involved in the design, manufacture and sale of products and services that are not considered to be essential but are highly desired within a culture or society.
The Near-Term Tax Free Fund invests in municipal bonds with relatively short maturity. The fund seeks to provide tax-free monthly income by investing in debt securities issued by state and local governments from across the country.
The U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund is designed to be used as an investment that takes advantage of the security of U.S. Government bonds and obligations, while simultaneously pursuing a higher level of current income than money market funds offer.
U.S. Global Investors, Inc. is an innovative investment manager with vast experience in global markets and specialized sectors.
Meet the leadership team and investment managers that bring unique knowledge and experience from a variety of fields.
Here at U.S. Global Investors, we strive to serve our clients to the best of our abilities by using explicit and tacit knowledge to detect and account for trends and patterns not only in the domestic markets, but also globally.
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For additional insights about U.S. Global Investors, the products that we offer, or details about your account, visit our frequently asked questions.
Get the need-to-know information about our financial products, from investment objectives, strategies, and performance to fees and fund management.
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The University of Texas at Austin (UT), just a couple of hours up the road from our headquarters in San Antonio, may soon unseat Harvard as the wealthiest school in the U.S. How has it managed to do this? In a word: Oil.
At a time when large sovereign wealth funds are divesting from fossil fuels and ESG (environmental, social and corporate goverance) investing has gone mainstream, the UT System has been the longtime owner and manager of 2.1 million acres of mineral-rich land, scattered across West Texas, that it leases out to as many as 250 producers, including ConocoPhillips.
Thanks to higher oil prices, the mineral rights to the land generate roughly $6 million every day, according to Bloomberg.
The UT System’s decision to continue participating in oil is in keeping with Texas’s close ties to the fossil fuels industry. The state produces more oil and gas (and wind power) than any other, a fact that policymakers are eager to protect. This week, Texas moved to restrict state pension funds from investing in BlackRock, UBS Group, Credit Suisse and a number of other financial institutions that have been found to be “hostile” toward the energy sector.
But it’s more than just tradition. UT’s oil investments have been incredibly profitable and, by most accounts, will continue to be so as long as the energy crisis deepens and inflationary pressures keep prices elevated. The S&P 500 Energy Index is by far the top performing sector for the year, up nearly 50%, compared to the broader market, which is off by 12%.
Looking ahead, energy stocks appear to be setting up for a new cycle of outperformance relative to the market. Take a look at the chart below, which shows the long-term ratio between the energy index and S&P 500. Technically, this may be the most attractive time to invest in energy since at least the beginning of the century.
Warren Buffett seems to agree. Last week, Berkshire Hathaway received regulatory approval to buy up to half of Houston-based Occidental Petroleum (OXY).
The disruptions of the past two years are believed to have triggered a readjustment in the energy market. In a just-released report, Deloitte projects that oil and gas producers could report the highest-ever free cash flow (FCF), as much as $1.4 trillion, in 2022. The industry could also become debt-free by 2024.
Although oil prices in 2022 have been equivalent to those in 2013 and 2014, cash flows are currently three times higher thanks to capital expenditure discipline after years of underinvestment, Deloitte analysts say. U.S. shale producers, which generated negative cash flows in nine out of the last 10 years, are expected to report record FCF of $600 billion.
This comes as the U.S. is set to export a record amount of crude oil this year and next as the country captures market share away from Russia. Since Congress lifted the 40-year-old oil export ban in 2015, weekly exports have steadily risen above 4 million barrels a day, but earlier this month, exports exceeded 5 million barrels for the first time. According to Bloomberg, U.S. suppliers will likely be able to hold on to the increased market share since producers in other regions, including those in the North Sea and West Africa, have not been growing output as rapidly as American companies have.
The backdrop to all of this, of course, is the expansion of ESG-minded investing and global financing of alternative fuels and renewable energy sources. This week, California became the first state to approve a ban on the sale of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035 in favor of electric vehicles (EVs). This is a huge opportunity, as investment in the state’s notoriously spotty power grid will need to increase significantly.
New, more reliable EV charging stations will also need to be installed. Earlier this month, J.D. Power announced that Americans’ satisfaction in charging infrastructure is declining due to a growing number of “inadequate” and “non-functioning stations.” 
“This lack of progress points to the need for improvement as EVs gain wider consumer acceptance because the shortage of public charging availability is the number one reason vehicle shoppers reject EVs,” the report reads.
The airlines and container shipping industries are also seeking ways to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. One method being used by airlines is sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), which reportedly reduces CO2 emissions by as much as 80%. The liquid fuel is normally produced from a number of sources, including waste oil and fats, municipal waste and non-food crops.
SAF is currently much more expensive to make than traditional jet fuel, but several companies and groups are leading efforts to scale up the technology. Boeing is establishing a facility in Japan to begin researching and developing SAF, while World Energy, a Boston-based low-carbon solutions provider, is planning to convert a refinery in Houston to an SAF plant. Earlier this month, Alaska Airlines announced it had finalized an agreement to buy 185 million gallons of SAF from biofuel company Gevo over five years starting in 2026. Alaska also has announced a collaboration between Microsoft and start-up firm Twelve to advance production of E-Jet, an even more sustainable fuel that’s made from carbon dioxide.
As for shipping, wind propulsion is being touted as the “most impactful emissions reduction technology.” Today, 21 large ocean-going vessels already have wind-assist systems installed, according to the International Windship Association (IWSA), and by the end of 2023, this number could jump to nearly 50. Some of the biggest names in maritime shipping are involved in investing millions of dollars into wind propulsion technology, including Cargill, Maersk and Mitsui. The IWSA calls the 2020s the “Decade of Wind Propulsion.”
Curious to know the most important invention of the 20th century? Find out by clicking here!
This week gold futures closed at $1,749.90, down $13.00 per ounce, or 0.74%. Gold stocks, as measured by the NYSE Arca Gold Miners Index, ended the week lower by 1.46%. The S&P/TSX Venture Index came in off 0.61%. The U.S. Trade-Weighted Dollar rose 0.59%.
U.S. Global Investors, Inc. is an investment adviser registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). This does not mean that we are sponsored, recommended, or approved by the SEC, or that our abilities or qualifications in any respect have been passed upon by the SEC or any officer of the SEC.
This commentary should not be considered a solicitation or offering of any investment product. Certain materials in this commentary may contain dated information. The information provided was current at the time of publication. Some links above may be directed to third-party websites. U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by these websites and is not responsible for their content. All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.
Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of (06/30/22): 
Boeing Co/The
American Airlines
United Parcel Service (UPS)
Wheaton Precious Metals
Ferrari
Toll Brothers
Cartier
Tesla
ConocoPhillips
Occidental Petroleum Corp.
Alaska Air Group Inc.
AP Moller-Maersk A/S
Mitsui OSK Lines Ltd.
*The above-mentioned indices are not total returns. These returns reflect simple appreciation only and do not reflect dividend reinvestment.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted average of 30 blue chip stocks that are generally leaders in their industry. The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies. The Nasdaq Composite Index is a capitalization-weighted index of all Nasdaq National Market and SmallCap stocks. The Russell 2000 Index® is a U.S. equity index measuring the performance of the 2,000 smallest companies in the Russell 3000®, a widely recognized small-cap index.

The Hang Seng Composite Index is a market capitalization-weighted index that comprises the top 200 companies listed on Stock Exchange of Hong Kong, based on average market cap for the 12 months. The Taiwan Stock Exchange Index is a capitalization-weighted index of all listed common shares traded on the Taiwan Stock Exchange. The Korea Stock Price Index is a capitalization-weighted index of all common shares and preferred shares on the Korean Stock Exchanges.

The Philadelphia Stock Exchange Gold and Silver Index (XAU) is a capitalization-weighted index that includes the leading companies involved in the mining of gold and silver. The U.S. Trade Weighted Dollar Index provides a general indication of the international value of the U.S. dollar. The S&P/TSX Canadian Gold Capped Sector Index is a modified capitalization-weighted index, whose equity weights are capped 25 percent and index constituents are derived from a subset stock pool of S&P/TSX Composite Index stocks. The NYSE Arca Gold Miners Index is a modified market capitalization weighted index comprised of publicly traded companies involved primarily in the mining for gold and silver. The S&P/TSX Venture Composite Index is a broad market indicator for the Canadian venture capital market. The index is market capitalization weighted and, at its inception, included 531 companies. A quarterly revision process is used to remove companies that comprise less than 0.05% of the weight of the index, and add companies whose weight, when included, will be greater than 0.05% of the index.

The S&P 500 Energy Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the energy sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Materials Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the material sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Financials Index is a capitalization-weighted index. The index was developed with a base level of 10 for the 1941-43 base period. The S&P 500 Industrials Index is a Materials Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the industrial sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Consumer Discretionary Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the consumer discretionary sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Information Technology Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the information technology sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Consumer Staples Index is a Materials Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the consumer staples sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Utilities Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the utilities sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Healthcare Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the healthcare sector as a subset of the S&P 500. The S&P 500 Telecom Index is a Materials Index is a capitalization-weighted index that tracks the companies in the telecom sector as a subset of the S&P 500.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is one of the most widely recognized price measures for tracking the price of a market basket of goods and services purchased by individuals. The weights of components are based on consumer spending patterns. The Purchasing Manager’s Index is an indicator of the economic health of the manufacturing sector. The PMI index is based on five major indicators: new orders, inventory levels, production, supplier deliveries and the employment environment. Gross domestic product (GDP) is the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country’s borders in a specific time period, though GDP is usually calculated on an annual basis. It includes all private and public consumption, government outlays, investments and exports less imports that occur within a defined territory.
The U.S. dollar index (USDX) is a measure of the value of the U.S. dollar relative to a basket of foreign currencies.
The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) program produces data on job openings, hires, and separations.
The Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index (MCSI) is a monthly survey of consumer confidence levels in the United States conducted by the University of Michigan.
The S&P 500 Energy Index is a capitalization-weighted index. The index was developed with a base level of 10 for the 1941-43 base period.
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Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by clicking here or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Foreside Fund Services, LLC, Distributor. U.S. Global Investors is the investment adviser.

Bond funds are subject to interest-rate risk; their value declines as interest rates rise. Tax-exempt income is federal income tax free. A portion of this income may be subject to state and local income taxes, and if applicable, may subject certain investors to the Alternative Minimum Tax as well. The Near-Term Tax Free Fund may invest up to 20% of its assets in securities that pay taxable interest. Income or fund distributions attributable to capital gains are usually subject to both state and federal income taxes. The tax free funds may be exposed to risks related to a concentration of investments in a particular state or geographic area. These investments present risks resulting from changes in economic conditions of the region or issuer. Gold, precious metals, and precious minerals funds may be susceptible to adverse economic, political or regulatory developments due to concentrating in a single theme. The prices of gold, precious metals, and precious minerals are subject to substantial price fluctuations over short periods of time and may be affected by unpredicted international monetary and political policies. We suggest investing no more than 5% to 10% of your portfolio in these sectors. Foreign and emerging market investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and less public disclosure, as well as economic and political risk. By investing in a specific geographic region, a regional fund’s returns and share price may be more volatile than those of a less concentrated portfolio. The Emerging Europe Fund invests more than 25% of its investments in companies principally engaged in the oil & gas or banking industries. The risk of concentrating investments in this group of industries will make the fund more susceptible to risk in these industries than funds which do not concentrate their investments in an industry and may make the fund’s performance more volatile. Because the Global Resources Fund concentrates its investments in a specific industry, the fund may be subject to greater risks and fluctuations than a portfolio representing a broader range of industries. Stock markets can be volatile and share prices can fluctuate in response to sector-related and other risks as described in the fund prospectus.
Morningstar Ratings are based on risk-adjusted return. The Overall Morningstar Rating for a fund is derived from a weighted-average of the performance figures associated with its three-, five- and ten-year (if applicable) Morningstar Rating metrics. Past performance does not guarantee future results. For each fund with at least a three-year history, Morningstar calculates a Morningstar Rating? based on a Morningstar Risk-Adjusted Return measure that accounts for variation in a fund’s monthly performance (including the effects of sales charges, loads, and redemption fees), placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance. The top 10% of funds in each category receive 5 stars, the next 22.5% receive 4 stars, the next 35% receive 3 stars, the next 22.5% receive 2 stars and the bottom 10% receive 1 star. (Each share class is counted as a fraction of one fund within this scale and rated separately, which may cause slight variations in the distribution percentages.)
Each of the mutual funds or services referred to in the U.S. Global Investors, Inc. website may be offered only to persons in the United States. This website should not be considered a solicitation or offering of any investment product or service to investors residing outside the United States. Certain materials on the site may contain dated information. The information provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in such materials, please visit the fund performance page. Some link(s) above may be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content. All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.
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